Sep 172010
 

Sunday, 19 September 2010: Update from Simon Brewer

 
Pressure is now 969mb! It’s dropped almost 46mb in the past 24 hours! Wind speed was sustained around 70 MPH with Gusts in the 90 MPH range a few minutes ago!

- Simon

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Sunday, 19 September 2010: 9:45 PM EDT Update from Simon Brewer

 
Pressure is now 975mb and the winds appear to be increasing in speed after a small lull in the action. Juston and I were swept off our feet by a massive wave, which crashed into shore! The eye may miss Bermuda, but we will definitely be hit by the eyewall (at least what used to be the eyewall).

- Simon

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Sunday, 19 September 2010: 4:50 PM EDT Update from Simon Brewer

 

We are now under the central dense overcast of Igor. The winds have recently increased in speed and gusts and the current pressure is 985mb.

- Simon

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Sunday, 19 September 2010: 3:45 PM EDT Update from Simon Brewer

 

Getting windier here! Definitely 60 MPH sustained winds with 80 MPH gusts!

 

Blowing palm trees in Bermuda on Sunday, September 19. Shot by Simon Brewer.

Blowing palm trees in Bermuda on Sunday, September 19. Shot by Simon Brewer.


 

Below: A compilation of 3 pictures showing the barometer at different times (time, date, and pressure can be seen on all 3 of the readings). Click on image for a larger view.

Three pictures showing the barometric pressure at three different times on September 19 in Bermuda.

Three pictures showing the barometric pressure at three different times on September 19 in Bermuda.

 

- Simon

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Sunday, 19 September 2010: 12:50 PM EDT Update from Simon Brewer

 

It’s 12:50pm AST and the winds are now sustained at strong tropical force speeds (50-60 MPH) with gusts up to hurricane strength (70+ MPH). The electricity has not gone out yet, but the lights have been flickering in the hotel room. It appears the center of the hurricane will pass to our west, but the ‘Eye’ of Igor is not defined by an eyewall, so the winds may get relatively calm as the center passes. The current atmospheric pressure at our location is 996mb.

- Simon

 

Visible satellite image of Hurricane Igor 16:15 UTC September 19

Visible satellite image of Hurricane Igor 16:15 UTC September 19


 

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Saturday, 18 September 2010: 6:55 PM EDT Update from Simon Brewer

 

Our old hotel was the Surfside Beach Club, but the owners became very scared and kicked us out even though the hotel told us before we flew out here they would not close or ‘give us the boot’! Lucky for us our producer, Erin, saved us and booked us a hotel at Elbow Beach.

We are so low in elevation and so close to the beach we may have a storm surge threat in our room! The waves are pounding the beaches and cliffs and it’s getting pretty breezy outside.

I’ll try to post a few pictures. We are concerned the causeway will be severely damaged by Igor or possibly the airport. This would bring the possibility of us not leaving the island at a reasonable time.

- Simon

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Saturday, 18 September 2010: Update from Simon Brewer

 

We’re at our hotel on the south side of the main island in Bermuda. It’s breezy and large waves can be heard and barely seen crashing on the rocky coastline about 50ft below our room! It’s going to be fun times for these two meteorologists!

- Simon

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Friday, 17 September 2010: 2pm EDT Update

 
Hurricane Igor appears to be intensifying with a well defined eye forming, and beautiful feeder bands and outflow. The visible satellite image (below) from this afternoon speaks for itself. Igor is moving towards an area of enhanced large scale lift associated with a jet streak. So that may help to explain his current structural improvements. The internal structure, or eye formation, of hurricanes is extremely difficult to forecast. So hopefully his eye will remain in tact for Simon and Juston on Sunday, assuming Igor passes directly over Bermuda. This is quite the gamble, but sure is worth it for these chasers if it makes a direct hit.

As I type this, Simon and Juston are getting ready to board their respective flights to Bermuda. They aren’t going to arrive until late tonight. Hopefully, they’ll have time to rest a bit before searching for a good place to document the hurricane tomorrow. That way they’ll be prepared for Igor’s high winds and storm surge on Sunday.

 

Visible satellite image of Hurricane Igor 17:15 UTC September 17

Visible satellite image of Hurricane Igor 17:15 UTC September 17


 

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Friday, 17 September 2010

Category 3 Hurricane Igor is headed for Bermuda. Simon Brewer and Juston Drake are flying there today to document this dangerous hurricane on Sunday. Read Simon’s thoughts on the chase below as him and Juston get ready for the chase. This is going to be an amazing experience for them, and hopefully they’ll have the ability to provide updates here throughout their chase.

 

Hurricane Igor track forecast from the National Hurricane Center

Hurricane Igor track forecast from the National Hurricane Center


 

Igor is currently a category 3 hurricane, with maximum sustained winds of 120 mph. He is expected to weaken slightly over the next couple days as he moves right for Bermuda. But, maximum sustained winds are still expected to be within category 3 status, or near 115 mph. Below are Simon and Juston’s thoughts on their chase.

 

Visible satellite image of Hurricane Igor September 17

Visible satellite image of Hurricane Igor September 17


 

From Simon Brewer: Goals and Outlook on the Hurricane Igor Chase

Juston and I are anxious to chase a hurricane; we almost jumped on Earl, but he didn’t pass close enough to the East Coast. We took a chance and chased Hurricane Bill last year in Nova Scotia and it paid out, so now we’re going the distance again and attempting an intercept of powerful Hurricane Igor (yes, it would be a better name for a Halloween Hurricane) on the small island nation of Bermuda. Our goal is to fly to Bermuda and document the worst Igor can dish out in the middle of the Atlantic, and hope the eye passes directly over our location to measure the minimum pressure of the Hurricane. We will bring some meteorological measurement instruments to get data during the storm, we will be taking video and photos, and provide live updates during the storm.

This will be a different type of hurricane chase for us, because we won’t be driving, except to the airport, instead, we’ll be flying to Bermuda. Once on the island we’ll go to our hotel and wait, measure, and document the hurricane helpless with no possibility to reposition if the eye wobbles away from our location. Bermuda is small, so almost any high location on the island will experience equal winds from the hurricane as it passes. Also, the coast is relatively high and rocky minimizing any damage from a storm surge. Bermuda is located in the relatively open eastern Atlantic Ocean, so locals have been pummeled by strong storms for centuries. The GDP per capita on the island is higher than any other Nation, so the island is covered with sturdy, nearly storm-proof structures. This means there should be minimal damage due to the strong winds associated with Hurricane Igor.

Bermuda will be a great place to document a hurricane like Igor; it is comprised of over a hundred small islands on the edge of a large extinct volcano in the open Atlantic Ocean. We hope to experience, measure, and document possibly Category 3 strength winds (maximum 1-minute sustained winds between 111-130 MPH) and large dangerous waves pounding the rocky southern coastline. I’m not sure what pressure we’ll measure, but I’m hoping it’s in the 940mb range.

Juston is flying out of Dallas in the early morning hours and should reach Bermuda Friday evening. I will be flying to New York to pick up one of my video cameras from NBC and then fly from there to Bermuda landing in the late evening. Juston and I will have all day Saturday to relax and get ready for Sunday’s assault from Hurricane Igor. We will be doing live phone interviews, possibly video interviews, and feeding pictures or video to Stormgasm.com and The Weather Channel as Igor affects Bermuda, so stay tuned with Stormgasm.com and The Weather Channel for the latest updates.

  6 Responses to “Simon and Juston (Storm Riders) Chase Hurricane Igor in Bermuda”

  1. Good luck and be safe!

  2. Hi, I am here in Bermuda, i actually wish i wasnt, ill keep watching to see what you guys document tho

    • Hi Nicky. Wow, I can only imagine what you might be going through with the media coverage and everything. I hope you and your family can stay safe. Thanks for visiting the site.

  3. Keeping a track on your reports, were at the fairmont southampton and we are the 2nd floor facing north and wow its getting really windy out there now!

  4. hello simon and justin…… my name is kristy lynn lewis…..I’m a big fan of your show u are good what u do on the show? If u need any help in the future plz e-mail me back

  5. hello Simon and Juston im 9 i love learning tornadoes and hurricans i have a torando book.

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